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Tracing Mobility: Cartography and Migration in Networked Space

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Michelle Teran: Tales from the Network: Performance, Piracy and Privacy in Hybrid Space
NTU Live Lecture
14 May 11am
Venue: Newton Arkwright Building, Goldsmith Street, Lecture Theatre 2
Nottingham Trent University

Location-based and image-making technologies are creating new ways of looking at the city and have given rise to an emergent form of physical terrain called hybrid space. Canadian artist Michelle Teran will give an overview of her artistic projects which primarily focus on performances and interventions that bridge media with urban space. Within her projects the social and cultural conditions influencing the production of media also start to become visible.

Encounter with Michelle Teran
14 May 4pm—6pm
Venue: Broadway Media Centre

The seminar will be limited to 15 participants, please arrive early or reserve a place by emailing marie@radiator-festival.org Her lecture will be followed by an afternoon seminar where various issues around media production practices introduced in the morning will be bought forward for further discussion. Living in a networked world involves a constant management between boundaries and social codes of conduct. How can we start to define the implications,capabilities and interrelations of living and working within contemporary physical / media space realities?

This is lecture and seminar is part of the Tracing Mobility: Cartography and Migration in Networked Space, a series of events which aim to increase knowledge about the cultural aspects of future mobility and the new spaces created by electronic networks.

Tracing Mobility is a pan-European arts programme produced by Radiator launching in Nottingham mid May 2010 and travelling to Warsaw (June/July 2010), Amsterdam (2011) and Berlin (2011). Radiator will present a series of residencies, workshops, events and symposia, examining the shifting terrain of global mobility and how developments in networked infrastructure are transforming our conceptions of time, space and distance.

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