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Category Archives: artistic research

To Sleep Together in Comfort (Which is Politics)

19-Dec-21


Workshop, 2021
Marc Herbst and Michelle Teran

A workshop on generative conflict and difference. This workshop was a semi-closed event, and embedded within the 2021 version of the Climate Care festival, curated by Soft Agency for the Floating University in Berlin. Participants invited to spend the night in the basin at the Floating University campus were members of the floating e.V and invited guests.

Slow Reading Group

18-Dec-21

The SLOW READERS are an informal research group. Against the pace of infinite urgencies surrounding AI and gender inequality, the SLOW READERS have embraced deceleration to look at gender inequality & AI. Their research is emergent, transdisciplinary, and at times, rubbing against the grain of linear logic. Rather than streamlining for clarity, SLOW READERS engage […]

Synsmaskinen

18-Dec-21

http://www.synsmaskinen.net/ Synsmaskinen is an artistic research conglomerate based at the Institute of Art at the University of Bergen. Synsmaskinen proposes a multifaceted inquiry into contemporary crises. Through a variety of interrelated artistic projects, a politically-charged horizon comes into focus: apocalyptic abysses, systemic entanglements, and hyper-complex realities. Globalised economy and culture are intertwined, forming a complex […]

STRATEGIES OF RECLAIMING: MICHELLE TERAN AT ELIA BIENNIAL

16-Jun-19

Michelle Teran will be participating and presenting at the Elia Biennial in Rotterdam, November 21st-24th, 2018. The theme of the Elia Biennial is ‘Resilience and the City’. In her performative lecture, she introduces various strategies for reclaiming, which she will discuss within the frame of the SHIFTING CENTRES, SHIFTING MARGINS thematic mobile sessions. Link to […]

CONGLOMERATE TALK SHOW AT KMD

16-Jun-19

Artistic Research will Eat Itself Conference

16-Jun-19

https://sarconference2018.org/ Michelle Teran, together with Frans Jacobi (KMD, Bergen) will lead “perception crisis machine conglomerate, a workshop which explores the machinic methods of the ongoing artistic research SYNSMASKINEN. (http://www.synsmaskinen.net/)

Future Guides for Cities: From Information to Home

15-Apr-17

“Future Guides: From Information to Home” is an artistic research project on following: how to practice and theorize following. It was carried out between 2010-2014 within the Norwegian Artistic Fellowship Programme and around the Bergen Academy of Art and Design. A final exhibition of my artistic research, “Your Revolution Begins at Home“, took place at the USF Gallery and Cinemateket in Bergen, September 4-14, 2014. “Confessions of an Online Stalker“, a critical reflection text on artistic results of the research, was submitted in 2015.

Link to Critical reflection

The study outlines the emergence of an artistic research method combining data mining, systems for mapping, storytelling, and translation and its application in the fields of media art, microhistory, and activism. The development of artistic works (several books, text, film, installation and public performance) become the aesthetic results of conversations, negotiations and reflections around the proceeding questions: How are tracking, guiding, following and stalking used as artistic research methods? What role does image production play in everyday life and how does it create tension between the public and private experience? How can strategies of translation provide the critical tools for experimenting with shifts between context, subjectivity and scale?

This artistic research reflects on a contemporary condition in which personal and social archives constitute a new type of city guide that challenges the official representations of cities online. It reflects on the phenomenon of documenting and sharing one’s urban life to the world online, an act reflective of a culture of making oneself and one’s life visible thus, present in online social networks. The work focuses on the micro or working on case studies, whereby the studying and following of trails of data produced by different individuals and seeing where it leads is a process of trying to establish where one “is” from other people’s data. However, the effort of pinning down a location is not merely to focus in a machinic system of (geo)precision on the place where one might be standing but to recognize the people who occupy (or have occupied) that place in the city. It is a method of online tracking which leads to spatial tracking, from which a narrative language emerges. The question is implicitly addressed: to what extent urban media art can help us to locate ourselves in the mediated city by offering to trace and reveal the connections between places, people, and digital culture. But what if the connections reveal a city in crisis? The research leads to a flight to Madrid and ends up in the homes of evicted families, where anti-eviction activists use digital information to locate and make public the everyday effects of crisis. In the foreground of the crisis is the crisis of the home. It is there that we encounter sites of political struggle, the act of making oneself and one’s life visible becoming a strategy for collective empowerment.

Reclaiming Workshop

30-Dec-16

public intervention, 2016

The Reclaiming Workshop is an exchange of models and strategies on the relations between places, materials and performative actions that are produced in the context of reclaiming.

Link to event page

The workshop was initially developed for the Neighborhood Academy program of 2016, which focused on forms of collective learning. It took place with the participation of various grassroots initiatives and affinity groups operating with Berlin, connected by the fight for the right to the city, and strategies for reclaiming. The Reclaiming Workshop took place in “Die Laube,” a three-story experimental “treehouse” providing a space for self-organized, community-oriented and future-oriented learning, located in the Prinzessinnengarten, a community garden located around Moritzplatz, Kreuzberg. We officially launched the event by hanging protest banners used by each of the participating groups on the façade of “Die Laube,” thereby designating it as a space for collective learning.

Microhistories Anthology

06-Apr-16

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Microhistories studies the form of the video essay, which can be said to treat its subject matter in a critical and investigative way while at the same time reflecting its processes and its considerations. It shares this preoccupation with the small, marginalized stories with an approach within the field of history, so-called microhistory. Here one studies habits and routines rather than deliberate actions, underlying mentalities rather than explicit views. In microhistory the exception is more interesting than the rule, including the everyday, the overlooked details – all this that can prove to be as important as the “grand” recognized history. This publication brings together the results of a three year artistic research project which brought together prominent practices and theoreticians within three fields – art, artistic research and microhistory – in order to build shared knowledge.

Editors: Magnus Bärtås, Andrej Slavik
Published by: Konstfack University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Stockholm
Contributors: Axel Andersson, Magnus Bärtås, Carlo Ginzburg, Mika Hannula, Behzad Khosravi Noori, Oscar Mangione, Suzana Milevska, Lina Selander, Lena Séraphin, Andrej Slavik, Lars-Henrik Ståhl, Michelle Teran

304 pages, softcover, color
Konstfack Collection, 2016

Critical Theories and Critical Practices in Research

02-Dec-14

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The conception and the structure of this publication is highlighting a possible understanding of artistic research from the perspective of using key concepts and the intervention methods of critical theory (in the way it is understood in the history and theory of contemporary art, instead of the way it is understood in philosophy) as well as from the perspective of the product of artistic research, as a work of art produced by former or current PhD candidates involved in artistic research doctoral programmes.

Contributors: Catalin Gheorghe, Henk Slager, Andrea Phillips, Mick Wilson, Michael Baers, Michelle Teran, Flis Holland, Rachel Mader, Jesper Alvær

pdf download here